Hazel Strange Erme Estuary Summers Day cropped
Exhibitions

Contemporary Passions

Annu­al exhi­bi­tion by mem­bers of the South Hams Arts Forum

Dates
29/06/21 – 11/07/21
Organisation
Region
Devon
Opening Times
10:00 – 16:00 10:00 – 17:00
Printmaker Rob Hopkins found himself wondering what Van Gogh might have produced had he focused on linocuts rather than pen and ink drawings, and set himself the challenge of working en plein air to capture the “sheer aliveness” of his subject matter.

Sue Farrow-Jones’ printmaking is inspired by birds and animals in the natural world, and she has developed a range of screenprinted designs for lampshades, combining metallic and opaque waterbased inks which come alive when the light shines through.

Gilly Cotter also shows printmaking, along with handbuilt ceramics, pastels and oil paintings, all inspired by birds, trees and the natural world.

Ed Hill too focuses on animal forms in his sculpture and assemblage, making use of metal objects found in charity shops, farms and bike shops, with each piece unique and often holding a sentimental meaning.

Always well represented in local exhibitions, the Contemporary Passions exhibition includes a range of responses to the landscape: Elen Claire Williams practises “the art of slow walking”, interpreting and recording her responses with a spiritual approach, and Hazel Strange, too, takes long walks along the coast, returning to the studio to develop her brightly coloured oil paintings that celebrate the changing light.

The local landscape also inspires ceramic artist Susan Luker, and she uses the flat platform of her handbuilt stoneware pots as a canvas to paint slips, engobes and a variety of crawl glazes with multiple layers and firings. Eleanor King enjoys capturing “scenes that fundamentally feel peaceful, calm and uplifting”, allowing the lightness of watercolour to depict fleeting moments and the drifting mists of the south west.

Exploring the interplay between digital photography and painting, Nick Cotter’s “digisurrealism” offers him the opportunity to explore how our minds, consciously and unconsciously, influence our perceptions of reality.